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These vertical seams - finish mold seams vis--vis the upper neck mold seams - may range from just slightly offset to 90 degrees offset (like shown at the linked image above).

The offset is a function of the orientation of the parison relative to the two molds (parison and blow molds) used on the particular machine, or occasionally, to the hot parison "sticking" to the neck ring of the parison/blank mold when transferring to the blow mold (Ceramic Industry 19-15).

Both seams are quite diagnostic of machine manufacture and are usually visible, though the seam at the top of the finish can be hard to see on some bottles - especially if the finish was fire polished.

Though patented and first used to a limited degree in 1903, the first Owens Automatic Bottle Machine licenses were granted to other manufacturers in late 1904 making 1905 the effective "beginning" (i.e., terminus post quem) date for bottles with all of the above listed machine made diagnostic characteristics (Miller & Mc Nichol 2002).

Bottles which have all the primary characteristics noted above (#1, #3, #4) bottles.

This mark is distinctive to the suction process which feeds glass into the bottom of an Owens machine's parison mold.

(Note: A movie clip showing this process in action is linked at the bottom of this box.) Suction scars can not be produced by feed and flow automatic machines (i.e.

In any event, the suction scar is found on mouth-blown bottles though suction scars are sometimes referred to as a pontil scar by the unfamiliar.

See the machine-made section of the Bottle Bases page for more information on these scars. with distinct suction scars were likely Owens machine produced.)6. Machine-made bottles tend to have few if any bubbles in the glass and the thickness of the glass is usually more uniform throughout the bottle as compared to mouth-blown bottles.(Note: It is likely that other types of suction based automatic bottle machines made in Europe in the 1920s - and possibly later - also produced a suction scar on the base of their products [Pearson 1928]. The presence of a circular valve mark on the base of a bottle (typically a wide mouth bottle or jar) is sure evidence of machine-made manufacture by a press-and-blow machine. This is especially true of later machine made bottles, i.e. (Note: The presence or absence of bubbles in the glass and relatively even distribution of the glass throughout the characteristic is not a primary feature of either machine-made or mouth-blown bottles, though there are strong trends.the suction scar on the base (point #5 above and picture to the left) can date no earlier than 1905 and are usually post-1910.General Machine-made Diagnostic Features: Machine-made bottles will exhibit most or all of the diagnostic characteristics explained and illustrated below.(This summary is largely an amalgam of Toulouse 1969b; Miller & Sullivan 1981; Jones & Sullivan 1989; Boow 1991; Cable 1999; Miller & Mc Nichol 2002; Miller & Morin 2004; empirical observations.) It should be noted that features #1, #3, #4, #5, and #6 are primary indicators of machine-made manufacture.There are at least two additional finish related mold seams - one at the top of the finish which encircles either the bore or sometimes the outside of the upper lip portion of the finish (sometimes of these seams are present) and a horizontal seam immediately below the finish which circles the extreme upper neck (called a "neck ring parting line").

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